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Teen Orgies… and the Parents Groups that Put them On the Internet

It's true! Hell in a handbasket, folks. Hell in a handbasket.

13 Responses to "Teen Orgies… and the Parents Groups that Put them On the Internet"

  1. Whoa!

    That's sweet...free PORN from the PTC.

    I gotta watch that show, now that I know how cool it is.

  2. yeah that's cool! Thank god Americans get upset by stuff like this, otherwise I'd never have heard of the show. Spread the word!

  3. Heh, the FCC and the Parents TV Council just boosted the ratings for Without A Trace… good job.

  4. That is just awful. I don't want my kids exposed to that. And how do you know when something like that airs before it's too late? Go FCC, stick it to 'em.

  5. Your kids will be exposed to things like this and worse... you know, it's a big big world out there. You can lock them up in your little inside place or you can help them learn to deal with it. The second idea, is, imho, part of what they call education.

    And I hate to break the news to you, but sooner or later your sun is going to fuck and your daughter is going to be fucked. Seeing things like this on TV, having some ideas to put things in context and in perspective will help them to deal with situations like that before they get fucked up.

    That's all imVHo, of course: I'm not a parent (yet)…

  6. Kevin, it's a parent's job to monitor what their kids are watching. The FCC isn't supposed to be a babysitter for your kids. There are already plenty of measures in place that help parents to decide what shows are appropriate for their kids. Without a Trace is a show about abductions, murders, etc. If your kids are old enough to be watching that kind of a show , then they're old enough to see some teenagers making out in their underwear. If you don't approve of such behavior, then it's a great time to sit your kid down and talk about why that kind of sexual behavior is not appropriate. It's not the FCC's job to do your parenting for you. Your kids are going to be exposed to far worse than a sexual TV episode. You just have to hope that you've done a fairly good job of teaching your kid your moral system. If you have, then a suggestion of an orgy on a network TV show isn't going to drive your kid into having wild uninhibited sex at parties.

  7. I certainly do not expect the FCC to parent my kids, and I have and do talk to my kids about sex and morals.

    I do expect the FCC to do their job to enforce their rules and regulations, just as I would expect the police to enforce laws reguarding public nudity.

    There is some expectation that if I walk down main street, I won't be exposed to girls/boys running around in their underware and if there is, the local law enforcement will take care of it.

    The FCC protects our public airways in the same fashion.

  8. There's a big difference between people making out in their underwear in public and the same thing happening on TV. Walking down the street, you have no choice about what you are exposed to. With television, you can choose what you watch. If you don't want to see a show with sexual content, then don't watch it. The current ratings system tells you if there is sexual content in the show. If you don't want your kids watching it, you can set the parental controls on your TV to block these kinds of programs. The FCC has done its job in giving parents the ability to control what their kids watch. The FCC is not supposed to be some kind of moral police force. A fundamentalist movement over the past decade has been attempting to make the FCC into this kind of force, and to some extent they have succeeded. The proper controls are in place to make sure that your kids don't see objectionable programming, but that doesn't seem to be enough for these fundamentalist parents groups.

    This whole thing just serves to point out Americans' ridiculous prudishness. The most popular shows in America are ones about murder, rape, and other violent crimes. You rarely hear a word from the FCC about these. However, the second you see a breast on TV or some kids kissing in their underwear, the FCC, powered by its fundamentalist Christian agenda, is all up in arms. It's a couple of kids making out. Big deal. God forbid (maybe that's the problem here) that adults should be able to watch programming with a little bit of toned down sexuality.

  9. Jason, I have to disagree.

    I do choose what I watch. And there is an expectation, because of FCC regulations, that there will not be any obscene or indecent content on broadcast TV between 6am and 10pm. "Without a Trace" obviously violated the regulation and (I believe) should be punished for doing so.

  10. If you choose what you watch, then why do you care if there's a little sexuality in a TV show? This is what I don't get. If you see that a show is going to be about teenage orgies and you don't like that kind of thing, simply DON'T WATCH THE SHOW. And certainly don't let your children watch it. Problem solved. See, the FCC didn't need to intervene at all. And this way, people who aren't quite so prudish can go ahead and watch the programming the way its creators originally imagined it.

    Many American adults don't feel as though showing sexuality on TV is immoral at all. Should they have limits placed on their TV experience simply because of the moral agenda of a minority? Sex is neither obscene or indecent, yet right wing Christians have managed to make it seem so in the guise of speaking for families. I'm tired of having my media experiences altered due to the moral views of others.

  11. Your media experiences haven't been altered, these regulations have been place for quite some time. It is people like you who think that anything goes if you slap a disclaimer on it who are altering my media experience. I don't object to obscene material after 10 p.m. because those are the guide lines that are set. I know not to let my kids watch TV shows that air after 10 p.m.

    What upsets me are shows like this that slap a discaimer on a show and think they're covered. What happens if you didn't catch the first 30 seconds of the show that had the disclaimer. You expect me to watch the first 30 seconds of every show that airs? The FCC set up regulations to aid parents in choosing what their kids can watch.

    You can still get your offensive material afer 10. I don't see why you need it to air before that.

  12. What upsets me are shows like this that slap a discaimer on a show and think they're covered. What happens if you didn't catch the first 30 seconds of the show that had the disclaimer. You expect me to watch the first 30 seconds of every show that airs? The FCC set up regulations to aid parents in choosing what their kids can watch.

    http://www.fcc.gov/vchip/

    Just set your TV not to display certain programming, and you're good to go. Additionally, most print and online TV guides show the rating for a particular show. Therefore you don't have to "watch the first 30 seconds of every show that airs." You say that the FCC "set up regulations to aid parents in choosing what their kids watch." That's exactly what the V-chip does. The after-10 restriction is ridiculous in a world where the technology and guidelines exist to prevent kids from seeing objectionable content. I see no problem in airing TV-14 programming before 10 as long as there are systems in place so that parents can prevent their kids from watching these shows.

  13. I wasn't aware of the V-chip. It sounds like a good tool to help parents. I'm happy to know that my next TV will have this technology, but I'm not going to go out and buy two new TVs for our house and a new TV for all my neighbors and kids' friends where my children might watch TV. I'm going to continue to support the FCC and their regulations to keep indecency off the public airways from 6:00am - 10:00pm and let people like you pay the premiums for obscene material.


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