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iPod Shuffle Sweet Spot

I agree with this article: the new Shuffle misses the sweet spot.

You shouldn't need an "adapter" to be able to listen to an MP3 player. It's not like the previous generation Shuffle was a cumbersome beast.

Apple's gone too far here. The old Shuffle was perhaps perfect. The new one is a big step backwards.

Apple is a prideful place, too - I don't see them eating humble pie and introducing the next Shuffle after this one with the glorious return of buttons.

5 Responses to "iPod Shuffle Sweet Spot"

  1. I disagree. But then again, I think you'll still be able to buy the old Shuffle for quite some time, either new or as a refurb.

    You don't "need" an adapter to listen to the Shuffle, unless you decide you want to listen without the Apple headphones.

    The true test will be how well the Shuffle responds to the headphone clicker. On my iPhone, the click to pause works about 1/2 the time, and the double click usually registers as a pause and not a "next track". If the Shuffle is as (un) reliable as the iPhone in this regard, it will be a failed product. If it have overcome this bug, it will probably be a big hit.

    1. Ted said on March 13, 2009:

      You don't "need" an adapter to listen to the Shuffle, unless you decide you want to listen without the Apple headphones.

      The Apple headphones merely include the "adapter." You still need something to control the Shuffle. I didn't say you had to buy it extra, just that you needed something in addition to the Shuffle itself in order to hear the music (aside from the completely obvious "headphones," which is understood).

      Ted said on March 13, 2009:

      If the Shuffle is as (un) reliable as the iPhone in this regard, it will be a failed product. If it have overcome this bug, it will probably be a big hit.

      I have an iPhone too and generally avoid using the clicker. It works most of the time for me, but that doesn't change the fact that this thing is completely unnecessary.

      They took an easy-to-use and fairly universally understood interface, "complexified" it up, and for what? To save a teeny little bit of space almost nobody really cared about?

      I'll put it this way: my 6-year-old can operate her last-gen iPod Shuffle just fine. She's incredibly bright (and also uses third-party headphones since her ears are too small for buds), and the new interface wouldn't fly with her at all.

      Six clicks to go back two tracks? Really? FAIL.

  2. I totally agree about the new shuffle. The previous 2 gens shared the 5-button interface that was just about perfect. They could have easily added voiceover to a 5-button shuffle, and it would've been great. Taking those 2 buttons away, and overloading the play/pause button with double- and triple-clicks, that's just too much.

  3. I agree as well. So much in fact, that when I first laid eyes on it I thought that it was a Photoshop joke. When I recovered, I made this site. The iMac shuffle. Apple has gone too far.

  4. I have a 3rd generation iPod. Apple is definitely willing to step back from a poor design.


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